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Climate For Teachers

We know that Climate Change will represent a growing part of the curriculum and our lives and without the knowledge to have meaningful discussions about it we are left feeling powerless to address it. Having a broader understanding is the best foundation to build a resilient view on what to do and how to talk to others about it.

As Education Lead for the Collective for Climate Action I am volunteering free introductions to the highly interconnected world of the Climate and Biodiversity Crisis.

You will also have the opportunity to discuss and ask questions about climate both in the session and as part of our public sector community. I have an MSc in Climate Change and Risk Management, have worked in Flood and Coastal Risk Management, community engagement and more in the Environment Agency, where I still work.

 

I am offering online sessions with the chance to ask questions live, at times that suit you. You are also welcome to join our UK-wide slack community and connect with public servants throughout the public sector.

Use the 'Contact' button below to ask me to deliver a session for your school

Outside the School
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Climate is a difficult subject, possibly one of the most difficult.

The philosopher, Timothy Morton, describes climate change as a hyper-object; an entity of such vast temporal and spatial dimensions that it defeats traditional ideas about what a thing is in the first place. This really does encompass the reason why climate change is so difficult to think about and so difficult to tackle. We hear different stories about climate research and impacts from different academic and media sources and there is often enough out there for us to believe that we will get through this with some electric cars, carbon capture and all the other innovations that promise us a future similar to today. There is also enough to send us spiralling into total despair at the prospect of so much migration from war and famine that we eventually reach complete, global societal collapse.

However, the reality is that we don’t know what is going to happen. I don’t mean concerning climate change; we have a sound understanding of what climate will do should we carry on with business as usual. We understand many of the feedbacks, we understand many of the tipping points and have a good understanding of the different ecosystems of the biosphere. What we don’t know is how humanity will respond. We have observational data on the speed of climate change in the present day and we have good historical data from; pollen records, ice and sediment cores, tree ring data and more to tell us what happens when the Earth is driven in and out of “ice ages”. What we haven’t ever seen is what humanity will do in a highly interconnected, global society as it both experiences and drives a change in climate 10 times faster than Earth has seen in the last 65 million years.

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Understanding climate helps us to see better solutions

We have to understand the reasons why we have made such a mess of it to imagine what solutions may finally get us through this and what the world may look like when that day comes. Gaining a basic understanding of these issues and how they relate to, and affect each other is a big part of understanding our relationship with climate, but the discussion is massively important too. As the Education Lead for the CfCA I work to maintain an understanding of our progress, the challenges and the solutions in the climate fight. As a group, we organise events with academics and experts around these issues and I have presented within the Environment Agency, in schools, to the Institute of Risk Management and members of the Collective for Climate Action, spread across the UK in over 240 government organisations.

It is too much to cover in one presentation but you will have the opportunity to ask questions and open up discussions on the different issues around climate.  As public servants, you are also welcomed to continue the conversation in our slack community. You can have a closed channel where you can discuss climate with other educators on other channels connected to councils, Defra, the Home Office and many, many more. Discussion is the key; people’s feelings are enmeshed in how they address the Climate and Biodiversity Crisis or don’t. It will also affect how you arrive at solutions that you can use with your pupils when discussing this shockingly unwieldy hyper-object of an issue.

Use the 'Contact' button below to ask me to deliver a session for your school